International Law

In early 2018, North Korea’s Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump were not on the best of terms, publicly lash­ing out at each other and threatening the destruction of the other’s state. And yet, within the year they were smiling and handshaking in Singapore, followed not long after by a second summit in Vietnam. These summits, focused on the prospect of North Korea’s denuclearization, have in fact raised important...

THE INTERNATIONAL LAW ORIGINS OF AMERICAN FEDERALISM

Anthony J. Bellia Jr.* & Bradford R. Clark**

Courts and commentators have long struggled to reconcile promi­nent federalism doctrines with the text of the Constitution. These doc­trines include state sovereign immunity, the anticommandeering doc­trine, and the equal sovereignty of the States. Supporters of such doctrines have generally relied on the history, structure, and purpose of the Constitution rather than its text. Critics have charged that the doctrines lack adequate support in...

The Supreme Court’s 2018 Jesner v. Arab Bank, PLC decision caused uncertainty for future and ongoing Alien Tort Statute (ATS) litigation in federal courts. In holding that foreign corporations are not subject to liability under the ATS, the Court foreclosed one avenue hu­man rights plaintiffs have sought to use for the past few decades to garner attention, and in some cases receive significant monetary settle­ments, for the abuses. Further,...

For a state to lawfully use force in anticipation of a cyber attack, the prospective attack must rise to the level of an “armed attack” under Article 51 of the United Nations Charter, and it must be “imminent.” While there is broad agreement that some cyber attacks will satisfy Article 51’s “armed attack” requirement, the question of how to evaluate whether such an attack is “imminent”—based on an analysis of the technology...

What obligations does a state have after it forcibly overthrows the regime of another state or territory? The Hague Regulations and the Fourth Geneva Convention provide some answers, but their prohibition on interfering with the governing structure of the targeted territory is outmoded. Based on a careful examination of subsequent practice of the parties to the conventions,...

China has experienced a surge in medical disputes in recent years, on the streets and in the courts. Many disputes result in violence. Quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence of medical malpractice litigation and medical disputes in China reveals a dynamic in which the formal legal system operates in the shadow of protest and violence. The threat of violence leads hospitals to settle claims for more money than would be available in...