Issue Archives

What distinguishes privacy violations from other harms? This has proven a surprisingly difficult question to answer. For over a century, privacy law scholars labored to define the elusive concept of privacy. Then they gave up. Efforts to distinguish privacy were superseded at the turn of the millennium by a new approach: a taxonomy of privacy problems grounded in social recognition. Privacy law became the field that simply studies whatever courts...

Law was central to the homophile movement, the main movement for queer rights between World War II and Stonewall. But examinations of this movement’s engagement with law have exclusively focused on public law. Private law has received virtually no attention. This Note corrects that oversight. It unearths instances in which groups advocating for queer rights invoked contract law during the 1950s and 1960s. These moments reveal contract law’s...

EMPLOYER-SPONSORED REPRODUCTION

Valarie K. Blake* & Elizabeth Y. McCuskey**

This Article interrogates the current and future role of employer-sponsored health insurance in reproductive autonomy, revealing the impact that employers’ coverage choices have on access to reproductive care and the legal infrastructure that prioritizes employer choice over individual autonomy.

Over half of the population depends on employers for health insurance. Laws regulating employer plans give employers exceptionally wide latitude...

The Reconstruction Congress provided for civil rights removal jurisdiction to enable a state-court defendant with defenses based on federal civil rights to remove the case against them to federal court. A series of late nineteenth-century Supreme Court decisions rendered the provision practically useless until Congress invited federal courts to reinterpret the statute in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. New archival research reveals how lawyers at...

THE END OF BATSON? RULEMAKING, RACE, AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE REFORM

Thomas Ward Frampton* & Brandon Charles Osowski**

On January 1, 2022, the Arizona Supreme Court announced the most radical change to the American jury in nearly thirty-five years: the elimination of peremptory strikes. Arizona’s move is part of a broader trend of states experimenting with new ways to counter racial exclusion in the selection of juries after decades of federal inaction. Perhaps as noteworthy as the reforms themselves is the way in which many have come about: Rather than announcing...

For people experiencing homelessness, lack of access to public bathroom facilities often forces the humiliating need to urinate or defecate in public. The bathroom options available to those experiencing homelessness do not meet the population’s needs. One solution that scholars and local leaders have proposed is to ban customers-only bathroom policies. Such bans pose difficult legal and political questions. Most significantly, the recent Supreme...

1983

Brandon Hasbrouck*

This Piece embraces a fictional narrative to illustrate deep flaws in our legal system. It borrows its basic structure and a few choice lines from George Orwell’s classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. Like Orwell’s novel, it is set in the not-too-distant future to comment on problems already emerging in the present. The footnotes largely provide examples of some of those problems and how courts have treated them in a constitutional law...

Scholars, policymakers, and the media acknowledge that surveillance can threaten privacy and increase the risk of discrimination. Surveillance of people with disabilities, however, is positioned as being a convenient way of averting a host of problems: It can be seen as a way to protect people with disabilities from abuse and neglect, to prevent Medicaid fraud, and to proactively protect school communities from mass shootings. Increasingly, as...

In states with restrictive Medicaid statutes, many transgender people seeking gender-affirming care look to the courts for injunctive relief to receive gender-affirming surgery. The standard to obtain injunctive relief necessitates, in part, a finding that the plaintiff would be irreparably harmed without the relief—in this case, without being able to access surgery. This Comment outlines dangerous implications embedded in the Ninth Circuit’s...

Book bans and censorship battles have garnered considerable attention in recent years, but one of the most critical battlegrounds is kept out of the public eye. Prison officials can ban any book that threatens the security or operations of their facility. This means that the knowledge access rights of incarcerated people are subject to the judgments of the people detaining them. This Note focuses on books about Black people in America and books...