The Review

June 2014, Vol. 114, No. 5

The Administrative Origins of Modern Civil Liberties Law

By:  Jeremy K. Kessler

 

This Article offers a new explanation for the puzzling origin of modern civil liberties law. Legal scholars have long sought to explain how Progressive lawyers and intellectuals skeptical of individual rights and committed to a strong, ...READ MORE

Free Speech and Guilty Minds

By:  Leslie Kendrick

 

It is axiomatic that whether speech is protected turns on whether it poses a serious risk of harm—in Holmes’s formulation, a “clear and present danger.” If this is correct, then the state of mind, or intent, of the ...READ MORE

Prosecuting Leakers the Easy Way: 18 U.S.C. § 641

By:  Jessica Lutkenhaus

 

18 U.S.C. § 641 prohibits the theft or misuse of federal government “things of value.” The federal government has used this statute to prosecute leakers of information: The government considers disclosure to be a type of theft or ...READ MORE

 

Overcoming Administrative Silence in Prisoner Litigation: Grievance Specificity and the “Object Intelligibly” Standard

By:  Antonieta Pimienta

 

The Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA) requires that prisoners exhaust available administrative remedies before filing a federal action challenging prison conditions. Thus, an inmate can only file a lawsuit in federal court after proceeding through each step ...READ MORE

Announcements

Columbia Law Review Notes Selected for Publication

Please join the Columbia Law Review in congratulating the following student authors on their selection for publication in the 114th volume of the Review: ... Read More

Announcing Columbia Law Review’s 2014–2015 Administrative Board

Congratulations to the Review’s new leadership! ... Read More