The Review

November 2014, Vol. 114, No. 7

The Negotiated Structural Constitution

By:  Aziz Z. Huq

 

The Constitution allocates entitlements not only to individuals, but also to institutions such as states and branches of the federal government.  It is familiar fare that individuals’ entitlements are routinely deployed both as shields against unconstitutional action ...READ MORE

Taking Images Seriously

By:  Elizabeth G. Porter

 

Law has been trapped in a stylistic straitjacket. The Internet has revolutionized media and communications, replacing text with a dizzying array of multimedia graphics and images. Facebook hosts more than 150 billion photos. Courts spend millions on ...READ MORE

The Attorney General Veto

By:  Jeremy R. Girton

 

Constitutional standing doctrine requires that a private party seeking to defend the validity of a state statute must possess a “particularized” interest in the statute’s validity. When California officials refused to defend the constitutionality of Proposition 8, ...READ MORE

 

The Shrinking Sovereign: Tribal Adjudicatory Jurisdiction Over Nonmembers in Civil Cases

By:  M. Gatsby Miller

 

Tribal jurisdiction over nonmembers is limited to two narrow areas: consensual economic relationships between tribes and nonmembers, and nonmember activity that threatens tribal integrity. Even within these two narrow fields, the Supreme Court has stated that tribal ...READ MORE

Narrowing Precedent in the Supreme Court

By:  Richard M. Re

 

“Narrowing” occurs when a court declines to apply a precedent even though, in the court’s own view, the precedent is best read to apply. In recent years, the Roberts Court has endured withering criticism for narrowing in ...READ MORE

Announcements

Columbia Law Review Notes Selected for Publication

Please join the Columbia Law Review in congratulating the following student authors on their selection for publication in the 114th volume of the Review: ... Read More

Announcing Columbia Law Review’s 2014–2015 Administrative Board

Congratulations to the Review’s new leadership! ... Read More