Vol. 117 No. 7

Constance Baker Motley
Symposium

ON JUDGE MOTLEY AND THE SECOND CIRCUIT

Raymond J. Lohier, Jr.*

Introduction Constance Baker Motley hardly needs an introduction in American civil rights circles. The first African American female attorney (and only the second female attorney) to join the storied NAACP Legal Defense Fund (LDF) in 1946 (after graduating from Columbia Law School), Motley was a legendary civil rights lawyer by the time she joined the […]

Education Rights
Symposium

Perpetual Evolution: A Schools-Focused Public Law Litigation Model for Our Day

James S. Liebman*

In celebrating the monumental accomplishments of the new form of public law litigation that Constance Baker Motley and her colleagues pioneered, this Essay reinterprets their paradigm-shifting body of work in a manner that obliges the current generation of civil rights advocates to change direction. In the hopes of reengaging the affirmative force of constitutional litigation after decades in which it has waned, this Essay argues that the central[...]

Education Rights
Symposium

BEYOND DOLLARS? THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS OF THE NEXT GENERATION OF EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS LITIGATION

William S. Koski*

With recent rejections of plaintiff challenges in Colorado, Texas, and California, and continued battles over implementation of court orders in Kansas and Washington, state court judges may be sounding a cautious note on the limitations of the almost half-century-old educational finance reform litigation movement. Undeterred, advocates for economically disadvantaged schoolchildren have not abandoned the judiciary as an institution for advancing[...]

Education Federalism
Symposium

From No Child Left Behind to Every Student Succeeds: Back To A Future for Education Federalism

Michael Heise*

When passed in 2001, the No Child Left Behind Act represented the federal government’s most dramatic foray into the elementary and secondary public school policymaking terrain. While critics emphasized the Act’s overreliance on standardized testing and its reduced school-district and state autonomy, proponents lauded the Act’s goal to close the achievement gap between middle- and upper-middle-class students and students historically ill served[...]

Civil Rights
Symposium

Constance Baker Motley, James Meredith, and the University of Mississippi

Denny Chin* & Kathy Hirata Chin**

Introduction In 1961, James Meredith applied for admission to the University of Mississippi. Although he was eminently qualified, he was rejected. The University had never admitted a black student, and Meredith was black. Represented by Constance Baker Motley and the NAACP Legal De­fense and Educational Fund (LDF), Meredith brought suit in the United States District […]